ammonia

market

Ammpower Offers A Game Changing Approach to Carbon Free Power

THE PROBLEM

The global clean energy movement is speeding up and focusing on shifting existing industries from current energy sources to clean and sustainable alternatives.

Existing industries have been searching for alternatives to power its move to a sustainable future, and AmmPower believes ammonia is its answer.

AmmPower is focused on providing large and medium size ammonia producing units for industry, manufacturing, heavy equipment operators, maritime & shipping.

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DIFFERENT TYPES OF AMMONIA & COSTS

Ammonia Types

BROWN (GREY) AMMONIA
Traditional Ammonia using Natural Gas. 1 Ton of Ammonia results in 2 tons of CO2.
BLUE AMMONIA
Traditional Haber-Bosch Ammonia method but using CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage). Also applies to Government grant of $50/ton.
TURQUOISE AMMONIA
Ammonia made using methane pyrolysis – splitting methane into Hydrogen & Carbon – also known as CARBON BLACK
GREEN AMMONIA
Ammonia made of Green elements and creating no CO2 by product.

Costs

HYDROGEN

$5/KG

ELECTRICITY

$0.05/KWH

WIND

$0.02/KWH

SOLAR

$0.05/KWH

TIDAL

$0.02/KWH

(These figures represent an average and vary across regions)

OBJECTIVES

1

Develop proprietary process and chemicals for developing green ammonia with minimal by-products and residual contaminants.

2

Design and manufacture modular & scalable green ammonia production units, delivering green energy onsite.

3

Scale production to readily provide industry leaders with ammonia manufacturing units.

HYDROGEN

Hydrogen (H2) is the most abundant element in the universe, and its combustion results in water as a by-product.  It can be utilized in sectors of the economy that have been hard to decarbonize, such as steelmaking and marine transport.  It may also serve as a long-term storage medium in the power industry. Governments and industries around the world are increasingly focusing their efforts on building out the infrastructure necessary to support a hydrogen economy.

How does ammonia work with hydrogen?

Among the major barriers to the widespread utilization of hydrogen are the ability to move and store it prior to its end use applications. It was in recognition of these challenges that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released its Hydrogen Program Plan.

Hydrogen can be moved (and stored) in one of four ways:

1

It can be trucked as a pressurized gas (containment vessels are needed to enable shipping of larger volumes at higher pressures).

2

It can be transported in specialized and expensive pipelines, but hydrogen make steel pipelines brittle unless the hydrogen is mixed with methane. Hydrogen is a simple molecule and easily escapes into the atmosphere, so pipelines need to be specially engineered to prevent loss.

3

H2 can be shipped in tankers as a liquid – which can increase tanker load by 5X over pressurized shipments, (which involves high costs and uses about 35% of the total energy content to liquefy the hydrogen to -425 °F).

4

Ammonia can transport Hydrogen safely in any of the methods above. Hydrogen can be moved chemically through liquid organic carriers (such as methylcyclohexane – MCH) that absorb or release hydrogen by means of chemical reactions, and in liquid inorganic carriers (i.e.: lacking any carbon-hydrogen bonds), such as ammonia (NH3).

Ammonia is the second most widely used inorganic chemical in the world, with global consumption estimated at 180 million tons per year.

With ammonia, you have one atom of nitrogen and three atoms of hydrogen bonded together, and the cost of ammonia is cheaper than diesel fuel – and its completely carbon free.

Ammpower aims to initially deliver economically scalable, modular, carbon free ammonia production that can be located at any customer facility.

AmmPower Aims To Bring an Ammonia & Hydrogen Future Nearer to You

With ammonia as the optimal carrier, the question becomes how to extract the hydrogen from the ammonia in an economically efficient manner. The answer lies in the development of a ‘cracking’ device that extracts hydrogen from the ammonia, releasing surplus nitrogen into the atmosphere while the remaining hydrogen is fed into an adjacent fuel cell.

If the global growth in electric vehicles (EVs) unfolds as forecast, with tens and eventually of hundreds of millions sold across world markets, the power grid may increasingly be stressed. Localized power generation from fuel cells may provide an answer. To avoid high hydrogen infrastructure costs ammonia could be placed in tanks at local filling stations, undergo extraction and conversion to hydrogen on demand, for direct use either in fuel cell vehicles or converted to electricity for EVs.

OPPORTUNITY

$70.3B

“Global Ammonia Industry to Reach US$70. 3 Billion by the Year 2027.”

– The Report Linker

(Source)

$81.42B

“Global Ammonia Market is Expected to Reach USD 81.42 Billion by 2025.”

– Fior Markets

(Source)

$2.5B

Oman-India JV plans $2.5bln green ammonia project in Duqm SEZ.

– Zawya

(Source)

$5B

Saudi Arabis invests $5 billion in hydrogen-based ammonia facility powered by renewable energy.

– Middle East Business Intelligence

(Source)

AMMONIA MARKET

AMMONIA AND THE MARINE INDUSTRY

Readily available market that is turning to ammonia for its energy needs.

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MAN Energy & Samsung Heavy Industries are part of an initiative to develop the first ammonia-fueled oil tanker by 2024.

Viking Energy is poised to become the first vessel propelled by ammonia fuel cells.

International Marine Organization has mandated that the marine industry must accomplish a goal of zero carbon emissions by 2040.

Over 120 ports are already equipped with ammonia trading facilities.

PROJECTED MARINE FUEL USE TO 2050

Ammonia, also known as NH3, is a colorless gas with a distinct odor composed of nitrogen and hydrogen atoms. It is produced naturally in the human body and in nature—in water, soil and air, even in tiny bacteria molecules.

Illustration: Michael Solita. Source: American Bureau of Shipping

Energy Capacity

Illustration: Michael Solita. Source: American Bureau of Shipping

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